Brittney Hoang and Laurelie Holmberg Accepted into Governor’s School Program

BRITTNEY HOANG AND LAURELIE HOLMBERG ACCEPTED INTO GOVERNOR'S SCHOOL PROGRAM -- From left to right: Brittney Hoang, Mr. Finley King, Laurelie Holmberg

DayOnna Carson

BRITTNEY HOANG AND LAURELIE HOLMBERG ACCEPTED INTO GOVERNOR'S SCHOOL PROGRAM -- From left to right: Brittney Hoang, Mr. Finley King, Laurelie Holmberg

DayOnna Carson, Staff Writer

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Sophomores Brittney Hoang and Laurelie Holmberg applied and were accepted into Tennessee Governor’s School program. Through this program, students have the opportunity to participate in various activities and courses related to the subject of their choice in a college environment. Applicants who work diligently and have outstanding performance at school are typically chosen by the universities that offer this experience.

“My initial reaction to the news was a bit delayed,” revealed Brittney Hoang, who was accepted into the school for science and engineering, “But everything sunk in after a week, and I finally realized that I was one of the students chosen to attend the program out of the entire state.”

The Governor’s School program was established to give top students, from private and public high schools alike, a chance to enrich their learning and expand their skills. Participants will get to stay on a college campus for a month out of the summer, with the same privileges of students that are enrolled at that university. Authorized instructors will be in charge of leading attendees in advanced, college-level classes.

“I believe this program will help me get college seminar experience and also prepare me for college,” stated Hoang.

Students in tenth and eleventh grade are eligible to apply for this program online and via their high school. Along with a positive academic record, recommendations from a counselor and two teachers are required before a student can be nominated or apply. Applicants will later receive a notice in February disclosing whether or not they have been accepted into the Governor’s School that they chose.

“I’m really ready to learn more about teaching as a profession and learn about how to conduct a classroom,” said Laurelie Holmberg, who got accepted into a Governor’s School for prospective teachers. “I am also excited to take a class on teaching special education, which is the field I wish to focus on!”

As of now, there are eleven different schools that are participating in the Governor’s School program, offering domains ranging from humanities and the arts to data analysis and innovation. With this privilege comes a scholarship that covers the cost of dormitories, eating arrangements, and tuition for students during their stay. Some colleges may offer courses that will be counted as college credit.

At the conclusion of the program, attendees are awarded a certificate of merit, signed by our governor, showing gratitude for their participation and hard work.

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