With Less Fee Money Paid, Central Looks to Title I Funding to Fill Gaps

CENTRAL'S EMPTY HALLS ARE REACHING FOR MORE FUNDING -- While students are in class, these high school hallways are just begging for some much needed funding.

Shelby Campbell

CENTRAL'S EMPTY HALLS ARE REACHING FOR MORE FUNDING -- While students are in class, these high school hallways are just begging for some much needed funding.

Preston Fore, Staff Writer

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Every year at Central High School, students and parents are pressured to pay their school fees, participate in fundraisers, and attend various sports events. Cooperation with these things helps keep our school funded. Central also receives money from the local, state, and federal government, but that total is much less than what is needed to run a school properly.

“Last year, we spent about $22,000 on copies alone,” stated Mrs. Tammy Cimino, the school’s bookkeeper. “A couple more thousand dollars are spent on things like wiring computers and the phone system.”

Basic school items like these put a huge dent in the school’s limited funding from the Hamilton County Department of Education (HCDE).

“We only received $16,577 from Central Office (HCDE) last year,” explained Cimino.

Of that tiny total, $100 is given to each teacher to pay for a year’s worth of paper, pencils, and other classroom materials. Each department then receives $100 to pay for things like new technology.

Central is among the 52 schools in Hamilton County that qualify for Title I Funding under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. This money is given to schools with a large percentage of low-income families to lessen the economic divide.

“Central High receives $81,000 each year from Title I Funding,” said Mrs. Kim Crawford, who is in charge of Title I Funding at Central.

Despite this, some expenses still remain uncovered. Thus, the rest is left for students and parents to fulfill through paying school fees and participating in various school-related events such as fundraisers and sports games.

“Last year we had about 927 students; only 105 paid their $60 supply fee,” shared Cimino. “Parents take advantage of school being free, [so] they don’t pay it.”

The Central Digest encourages students and parents to participate when Central is trying to raise money; it allows us to educate better and to buy things we need.

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